Insolvency Oracle

Developments in UK insolvency by Michelle Butler

IVAs: survival of trusts and breach processes – are they successfully addressed by the R3 or Protocol Standard Terms?

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With the inaudible release of R3’s revised Standard Terms & Conditions (“STC”) for IVAs and the revised IVA Protocol effective from 1 March 2013 (albeit that the STC have been out since July 2012), I thought it was timely to express my personal views on the STCs and particularly on areas where I feel they are limited and therefore where the Proposals should take over.

R3’s revised STC are located at: http://www.r3.org.uk/media/documents/technical_library/IVA%20Standard%20Terms/IVA_standard_terms_version_3_web_version.pdf

The IVA Protocol and STC can be found at: http://www.insolvencydirect.bis.gov.uk/insolvencyprofessionandlegislation/policychange/foum2007/plenarymeeting.htm

Bill Burch has done a great job of examining R3’s revised STC and has blogged on all the changes from the last version: http://complianceoncall.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/hot-news-revised-r3-standard-terms-for.html. Over the past year, I had heard rumours of a revision being under way and I now regret not lobbying R3 for some more extensive changes. Thus, whilst it could be said that I only have myself to blame, it won’t stop me whinging about the fact that the issues that I’ve always had with the R3 STC remain unchanged in the current version. I have to say, however, that the two main issues I have are not unique to R3’s STC – in my view, the Protocol’s STC are equally, albeit differently, deficient – and, of course, they can be overcome by careful additions to the IVA Proposal itself, which takes precedence whether R3’s or the Protocol’s STC are used.

Trust Assets

R3’s STC state (paragraph 28(3)) that the trusts (also defined by the STC) survive the IVA’s termination and the assets shall be got in and realised by the Supervisor and any proceeds applied and distributed in accordance with the terms of the Arrangement. The Protocol STC are silent on whether the trusts (defined similarly to the R3 STC) survive, so (unless the IVA Proposal itself covers this), presumably in accordance with NT Gallagher, they usually do.

Does an IP really want to remain responsible for realising assets once an IVA has failed? Wouldn’t it be better to leave it to a subsequently-appointed Trustee in Bankruptcy? Perhaps an example of what might happen might help demonstrate the issues…

An IVA is based on five years contribution from income plus equity release from the debtor’s home in the final year. In year one, the IVA fails through non-payment of monthly contributions. What responsibilities does the (former) Supervisor have to deal with the debtor’s home? I believe it all depends on whether the house is described in the Proposal as an excluded or included asset. If the house is not an excluded asset, then the IP can find that he/she is responsible for realising any equity in the property, which now may be all the debtor’s interest in the property, not the 85% envisaged by the Protocol, and I doubt that the IP can assume that he/she can wait a few years before realising the interest, as per the original Proposal.

If funds related to property equity are included in an IVA, it usually seems that the property (or at least the debtor’s interest in it) is described as an included asset – and the Protocol’s equity clause seems to lead to this conclusion. Would it not be better for such IVA Proposals to define the property/interest as an excluded asset and simply provide that a sum equal to (rather than “representing”) 85% of the interest will be contributed to the Arrangement in Year 5? That way, at least the IP does not find he has to realise the property/interest as a trustee (with a little “t”), which could be more troublesome than if he handled it under the statutory framework as a Trustee in Bankruptcy. Then again, no bond… no annual reports… no S283A..? It could be quite liberating!

The absence of a post-termination trust provision in the Protocol creates another difficulty for IPs acting as trustees of an NT Gallagher trust. As the R3/authorising bodies’ guidance on Paymex explained, the Protocol STC do not provide for any fees to be paid under a closed IVA trust (whereas R3’s STC do), so, unless the Proposal itself addresses this, the IP acting as a trustee on termination of an IVA must seek creditors’ approval to his/her fees for so acting and may only deduct such fees from the dividend payable to consenting creditors.

Thus, I feel it is important for IPs to ensure that they do not rely solely on the STC to deal with any trusts, but ensure that Proposals themselves are worded satisfactorily.

Breach Process

Both R3 and the Protocol provide for the Supervisor to serve notice on a debtor who fails to meet his/her obligations under the Arrangement and allows some time (R3 STC allows one to two months; the Protocol allows one to three months) for the debtor to remedy the breach.

As Bill Burch has identified, the R3 terms (paragraph 71(1)) now appear to accommodate a scenario where the Supervisor has already petitioned for the debtor’s bankruptcy before he/she serves notice of breach, however it seems that the terms do not provide for the Supervisor to present a petition under any circumstance other than after the creditors have so resolved after the notice of breach process has been followed. There is a provision at paragraph 15(2), which seems to give the Supervisor power to act on directions given by “the majority or the most material of creditors”, although it would be an odd circumstance if an IP used this to move swiftly to a bankruptcy petition.

The Protocol’s STC seem a little more practical to me; at least they provide for the Supervisor to terminate the Arrangement if requested by the debtor (paragraph 9(6)). Thus, if the debtor simply wants to walk away from the ongoing commitments of the IVA, there is a swift way of bringing it to a conclusion. Without this clause, i.e. as per R3’s STC, it seems to me that, even if the debtor has no intention of remedying the breach, the Supervisor has to go through the rigmarole of serving notice of breach, waiting a month, then calling a creditors’ meeting to reach agreement as to what to do next. And what happens if the creditors’ meeting is inquorate? Under R3’s terms, the Supervisor does not appear to be authorised to terminate the Arrangement; and under the Protocol STC, I also feel it is tricky for the Supervisor, as under paragraph 9(5), the Supervisor can issue a certificate of termination or seek creditors’ views, so again I am not sure what options are left for the Supervisor on an inquorate meeting.

Minor flaws in the R3 STC

Bill has picked up on many of the STC typos and minor flaws, such as references to filings at Court, which are now only required for Interim Order IVAs following the 2010 Rules. He has also spotted – and I will repeat here for emphasis – that R3’s STC (paragraph 13(2)) seek to address the issue of the powers of Joint Supervisors, despite the fact that the 2010 Rules changed R5.25(1) so that a resolution must now be taken on this matter, i.e. a separate resolution from approval of the Proposal itself.

I also noted that R3’s STC have not been updated to reflect the 2005 Rules, which changed Rule 11.13 regarding the calculation of a dividend on a debt payable at a future time. I guess there is nothing wrong with IVAs using the pre-2005 formula, but I would have thought it would make sense to follow the bankruptcy standard.

I note that R3 has changed the majority required for variations – understandably from an excess of three-quarters to simply three-quarters or more (paragraph 65(2)) – but, I ask myself, why not have a simple majority for variations? And why add in for variations the R5.23(4) condition regarding associates’ votes? Why not follow the Protocol’s process of a simple majority to pass variations? 08/04/13 EDIT: Please note that there is an apparently widely-held view that the Protocol STCs provide for a 75% majority for the approval of variations – see blog post http://wp.me/p2FU2Z-2K.

A final techy flaw: both R3 (paragraph 71(2)) and the Protocol STC (paragraph 9(2) and (4)) continue to reference the old-style Supervisor reports on the progress and efficacy of the Arrangement, per the old R5.31, which has now been replaced by R5.31A.

Minor flaws in the IVA Protocol STC

The minor issues I have with the Protocol STC appear to have been created by the addition of terms over the years, resulting in some inconsistent treatments.

Paragraph 8(8) states that creditors must be informed within 3 months of the Supervisor agreeing a payment break with the debtor. Why the urgency, given that paragraph 9(2) states that creditors need only be told of the generation of more than 3 months’ arrears of contributions, which I would think is of more concern to creditors, in the next progress report?

Paragraph 10(9) states that the Supervisor may call a creditors’ meeting to consider what action should be taken when he/she fails to reach an agreement with the debtor regarding the treatment of “additional income”. That paragraph states that “any such creditors meeting should be convened within 30 days of the Supervisor’s review of your annual financial circumstances”, however paragraph 8(5) states that the debtor must report additional income to the Supervisor when it arises. This means that, if the Supervisor wants to call a creditors’ meeting regarding additional income arising outside of the Supervisor’s annual review, he/she may have a long time to wait!

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Despite these issues, I echo Bill’s sentiment: to err is human… although between us all we might get a little closer to perfection.

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